Michigan Primary 2022 Candidate Guide: Wayne County Commission

Editor’s note: WDET distributed candidate surveys to candidates in contested primary races. See a list below of all the candidates for county offices below and read some of the platforms and bios of candidates who responded to our survey requests. 

Responses have been edited for length and clarity. Opinions are the candidates’ own and inclusion in this guide does not mean endorsement. We will be updating this list as candidates submit their surveys.

To see what’s on your ballot, click here.

Infrastructure, the economy — especially rising inflation — and education are some of the issues Wayne County Commission candidates cite for reasons in seeking a seat on the board. Masks and vaccines, which studies show have reduced the risk of people getting and spreading the virus, were also top issues for some candidates.

Meet some of the hopefuls running for the county commission.

County Commissioner – 1st

Brian Banks, Democrat

Wayne County Commission Brian BanksAge: 45

Current job: Governmental & Education Consultant

Education: Ph.D., Public Policy & Administration, Walden University; Juris Doctorate, Law, Michigan State University College of Law; Master of Education & Bachelor of Science, Wayne State University; Product of Detroit Public Schools

Tell us about yourself in 200 words or less: I hold a Ph.D. in Public Policy & Administration from Walden University, a Juris Doctorate from  Michigan State University College of Law, and both a Master of Education & Bachelor of Science from Wayne State University. I understand the importance of engaging the office of the citizen. If elected, I will work to ensure that equity and inclusion are present, which will afford each citizen a better quality of life. When every member of society has an opportunity to contribute to the conversation, we have the ability to create policy that empathizes with all. My focus is on improving the quality of life for current residents to provide the necessary support and resources for them to thrive within our community by investing in their mental health, education, job training programs and affordability. Ensuring that equity and inclusion is an active part of our work that is a continuous, intentional commitment to promote healthy people, healthy communities, and the overall success of present and future generations. We can accomplish so much more when we work together!

Why are you running for county commission? Whether you’re a teacher, factory worker, restaurant employee, or unemployed, you deserve a strong voice in county government, a person who will represent your interests. When every member of society has an opportunity to contribute to the conversation, we have the ability to create policy that empathizes with all. My focus is on improving the quality of life for current residents to provide the necessary support and resources for them to thrive within our community by investing in their mental health, education, job training programs and affordability. Ensuring that equity and inclusion is an active part of our work that is a continuous, intentional commitment to promote healthy people, healthy communities, and the overall success of present and future generations. We can accomplish so much more when we work together!

What are the top three priority issues that Wayne County faces and what actions would you, as commissioner, take regarding each of them? I understand the importance of engaging the office of the citizen. If elected, I will work to ensure that equity and inclusion are present and to afford each citizen a better quality of life. Together, we will address the issues that matter most to you including:

  1. Stop property tax overassessments: Detroit homeowners were overassessed by $600 million over a six-year span. These overassessments were illegal; they were systemic, and they gutted out our neighborhoods. The Michigan Constitution states that no property can be assessed at more than 50% of its market value, but the city assessed 55%-85% of its property in violation of that law. This overassessment led to 100,000 Detroiters losing their homes when they should not have. When these property values come to the county, as commissioner, I will make sure the property values are true and fair and stop illegal tax foreclosures.
  2. Increase funding for mental health services: Approximately one in five people live day-to-day with some form of mental illness. Every one of us has a friend or family member affected by these conditions. Many are coping with PTSD and depression, and too many have died as a result of suicide. COVID-19 and the pandemic has made matters worse. As commissioner, I will work to make sure we are adequately funding our mental health services so residents can have access to the resources they need.
  3. Improve our failing infrastructure: We can’t continue to put Band-Aids on our roads and bridges forever, it’s time to invest and fix them properly. An ever-growing percentage of road and bridges are in poor to critical condition and the root cause of these conditions is decades of underinvestment. This has become a safety issue for our residents. As commissioner, I will work to address issues that put residents and residents’ safety first.

Tim Killeen, Democrat

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


John Barry Anderson, Republican

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


County Commissioner – 2nd

Matthew Johnson, Democrat

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


Jonathan C. Kinloch, Democrat

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


County Commissioner – 3rd

Armani Asad, Democrat

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


LaMar Lemmons, Democrat

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


Martha G. Scott, Democrat

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


John Szczepkowski, Jr., Democrat

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


County Commissioner – 4th

Donald Agee, Jr., Democrat

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


Lisa R. Carter, Democrat

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


Cara A. Clemente, Democrat

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


Glynis Joy Woodfork, Democrat

Candidate did not respond to survey request. View Woodfork’s campaign website here.


County Commissioner – 5th

Irma Clark-Coleman, Democrat

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


LaTanya Garrett, Democrat

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


Gary Hunter, Democrat

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


Steven W. Lett, Democrat

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


E’yandra D.A. Otis, Democrat

Wayne County Commission E'yandra D.A. OtisAge: 39

Current job: Full-time candidate

Education: Detroit Mumford High School

Tell us about yourself in 200 words or less: I am the grandson of a 98-year-old Navy vet and son of a divorced mother of 2. I am a father, husband and community leader. I was born in this district. I have turned my life around and want to inspire others to do the same. I graduated from Michigan State University/Michigan Political Leadership Program, Movement Politics, NLC, Kanada Fellowship and several other programs. I am a precinct delegate, worked for several nonprofits and previously worked under former Councilman Roy McCalister, Jr. I am chairman of the Millennial Roundtable, former vice chair of Detroit Young Dems, former board member of Young Democrats of Michigan and a part of several community organizations.

Why are you running again for county commission and why should voters elect you? I am running because I feel a new district deserves new, fresh leadership. Due to Wayne County also going through a form of redistricting, this affords me the opportunity to be that voice. My plan is simple and is called the OTIS+ M plan, which means Opportunity, Transparency, Inclusion, Seniors and Mental Health. This is no slight to anybody but the city, state and country are moving forward. We owe ourselves as a county the opportunity to bring in new leadership. We should want leaders that understand that every day is a work day, part time or not. We need leaders who will advocate for issues outside just Wayne County. I want to work with my partners in the city and state and also the federal government to help make a better walk of life for all residents in District 5.

What are the top three priority issues that Wayne County faces and what actions would you, as commissioner, take regarding each of them? I would say opportunity, transparency and mental health. As government officials and leaders of communities, I feel it is our responsibility to create new chances for citizens to better their lives. We have spaces that can be activated into farmers markets, food truck rallies and event spaces. We also have women that do contractor work who need the opportunity to contract for the County. I want to help start that wave. A lot of people do not trust the government and rightfully so. I want to be as transparent of an elected official as possible. I believe we can relax parking with the help of the city during Commission meeting hours in a designated area. I believe we can partner with the City of Detroit and live broadcast our Commission meetings on one of the city channels. Through the charter and rules of procedures, the Wayne County Commission can hold eight more meetings in the community. I want to see us do so as an elected body of government. I also feel we have a mental health crisis that is getting worse. We need to partner with the city, state and federal government to create a mental health facility in the City of Detroit. It only takes one thing to go wrong and a person’s mental state can forever be changed. We need to be more aggressive in tackling this crisis and finding the funding to do so. Even if it means to take a trip to Washington, D.C., to advocate for such a facility, I will do so as the next Wayne County Commissioner of District 5.


County Commissioner – 6th

Monique Baker McCormick, Democrat

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


Jennifer White, Democrat

Age: 49

Current Job: I had been an Assistant Manager in a local deli but am taking the next couple of weeks to focus on my campaign. It’s time for me to use my education and get back to my career.

Education: Bachelor of Fine Arts with Political Science/Pre-Law double minor and a Master of Art in Liberal Studies, both from Madonna University in Livonia.

Tell us about yourself in 200 words or less: I have 25 years of political experience including more than forty campaigns for municipal, state and federal candidates.  I went to college late in life and knew my passions were politics and art so I planned my education to prepare me for public service.  I was also a home care giver for my mother from April, 2012 until she passed in May, 2021.  My mom raised me on grass root politics and instilled me with passion.  She was only supposed to live for six to eighteen months but together, we fought through four bouts of cancer and emergency brain surgery.  At the same time I was able to work my way up from volunteer to Legislative Aide and Office Manager for Wayne County Commissioner Burton Leland, District 6(7). Sadly, Commissioner Leland was forced to resign due to his own health in January, 2018 and my appointment died with him.  As my mother’s health diminished I was forced to work closer to home with more flexibility and I wouldn’t change a moment.  I dedicate myself to whatever I do, be it the deli or home health care or Wayne County Commission District 6, again.

Why are you running for County Commission and why should voters elect you? Voters should consider me because I have 12 years of experience volunteering and working for the Northwest Detroit District 6(7) and I have lived in Redford for 22 years so I have a good understanding of the Township.  I believe this combination makes me uniquely qualified for this seat. When I worked for District 6(7) as Office Manager I was able to accomplish a lot.  I was the Program Manager for our Summer Clean-Up Program and loved to get out and physically help mow fields and demolish houses. I helped constituents with tax, utility and permit issues and used the power of the office to lobby at every level of government. I tracked abandoned houses until we got results. I got dirt and stumps for community gardens. Whatever a constituent called about it was my job to research and tackle it, plus all the daily business of the office.

What are the three priority issues that Wayne County faces and what actions would you, as a commissioner, take regarding each of them? I believe the top three priority issues for the county are the environment, infrastructure and public safety.  As a commissioner I would attend every meeting and endeavor to bring every dollar of the budget possible to my district. Specifically, for the environment I would start working on a countywide recycling plan so every community can recycle at the curb and increase the number and locations of Hazardous Waste Days.  I don’t need to explain the problems with the roads and bridges in Wayne County to anyone but I do have experiencing researching the responsible entities and hounding them, be they city, state, federal, or any combination of the three, until something gets done. For public safety I want to make sure that the Sheriff’s Office is adequately and appropriately funded. I want to be an advocate, whenever possible, for the freedom and safety of all.


Celeste T. Mentag, Republican

Age: 46

Current job: Children’s book author

Education: High School graduate

Tell us about yourself in 200 words or less: I am a wife and mother living in Wayne County for eight years. I have written two children’s books and volunteered my time to serve in Nursing Home bible study and Vice Chair of our school’s Parent Organization.

Why are you running for county commission and why should voters elect you? I am running for county commissioner because our county commissioners became authoritarians and dismissed the constitutional rights of Wayne County residents to choose for themselves, the best mitigation methods to keep themselves and their families safe. Voters should vote for me, because I believe checks and balances and the rule of law must be restored, so the people can have trust in the process of our Republic. I will uphold, protect and preserve their rights, to be the sole arbiter of their lives.

What accomplishments during your term as county commissioner, would you like to accomplish? Removing ballot drop boxes to prevent voter disengagement, keep the tabulation of ballots to be decentralized and counted in their local precincts.

What are the top three priority issues that Wayne County faces and what actions would you, as commissioner, take regarding each of them?

  • Roads — Reallocate money from projects, that are inefficient and wasteful.
  • Economic recovery — Support and advocate legislation to give deferment of the payroll tax to employers and give employees the option to opt out of paying social security and Medicaid for 5 years.
  • Public safety — Support and advocate to increase funding for our law enforcement officers to have the equipment and training needed to protect our communities.

County Commissioner – 7th

Alisha Bell, Democrat

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


County Commissioner – 8th

David Knezek, Democrat

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


William Collop, Jr., Republican

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


County Commissioner – 9th

Terry A. Marecki, Republican

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


County Commissioner – 10th

Melissa Daub, Democrat

Candidate did not respond to survey request. View her campaign website here.


Michael Brackney, Republican

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


County Commissioner – 11th

Toni Clark, Democrat

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


Al “Abdul” Haidous, Democrat

Wayne County Commission Al HaidousAge: 79

Current job: Wayne County Commissioner of the 11th District

Education: High school

Why are you running again for county commission and why should voters re-elect you? I believe everyone has a responsibility to serve their community in whatever capacity they can. For me public service has been the way I give back to my community. I started as a City Council Member in the City of Wayne, then Mayor of Wayne, and now as Wayne County Commissioner of District 11. My service and experience provide me with a great wealth of knowledge and skills to get things done. I want to continue to work with my constituents to find solutions and new opportunities to improve District 11 while moving us forward. I raised a family in this district and I am deeply invested in its long-term success.

What are your accomplishments during your term as county commissioner?

  • Built Waltz Bridge
  • Repaired Huron Drive Bridge
  • Rerouted drainage issues in Huron township
  • Partnered with Michigan Works to provide free education and training programs to the Wayne County Workforce
  • As Chairman of the Detroit Metropolitan Airport worked to enhance the travel experience throughout the region
  • As a SMART board member helped to make it easier for people to get to and from work

What are the top three priority issues that Wayne County faces and what actions would you, as commissioner, take regarding each of them?

My goals are to continue:

  • Working on infrastructure issues;
  • Developing more training opportunities for the Wayne County workforce;
  • Working with stakeholders in the area of economic development to support businesses in Wayne County and draw new business into Wayne County.

Corey James Blue, Republican

Wayne County Commission Corey J BlueAge: 38

Current job: Mechanical engineer

Education: BS in Mechanical Engineering AS in Manufacturing

Tell us about yourself in 200 words or less: I’m a graduate of Missouri Science and Technology with a degree in mechanical engineering. I’ve been married to my wife for 18 years. We have a beautiful family of three girls and one boy. I started fighting corruption in Sumpter Township when the board of trustees decided it was in their best interest to sell a piece of land valued at $400,000 for only $47,000 in a sealed bidding format. It didn’t matter to them what the surrounding families wanted to see happen to that property or that it was in a residential community. It was a marginalizing experience. Then I learned that a new deep well is being drilled at Carleton Farms where all the runoff water from the trash pile is going to be stored under the water table and none of the local elected officials lifted a finger to stop it. Then the COVID pandemic hit, and the mask mandates occurred at the local level where personal choice was taken away.  Then people were being threatened with the loss of employment for not taking the vaccine and you were again marginalized and banned from public discourse.

Why are you running for county commission? I’m running for commission because the only time the current commissioners care about the electorate is during election season, we are nothing more than votes to them. Elected officials around here view “their” positions more as a career path than actual service to the public. This can be observed in their reactions during public discourse. They never have the realization that their position is actual the people’s position. When it came to COVID mandates our commissioners never once listened to the public, they marginalized the public.

What are the top three priority issues that Wayne County faces and what actions would you, as commissioner, take regarding each of them?

  • Stop all local unconstitutional mandates associated with personal health choice and business closures.
  • Giving the public their voice back through listening and improving transparency.
  • Address inflation at the local level by fighting property tax increases that the current administration is pushing.

County Commissioner – 12th

Glenn S. Anderson, Democrat

Age: 68

Current job: Wayne County Commissioner

Education: Wayne State University, University of Michigan-Dearborn

Tell us about yourself in 200 words or less: I have been married 45 years and have lived in Westland since 1978. My wife and I have two adult children and 4 grandchildren. I served on the Westland Civil Service Commission and Westland Planning Commission before being elected to the Westland City Council from 1992-2000, I retired from Ford Motor Co. after 28 years upon being elected to the Michigan State House of Representatives where I served for 6 years, I was elected to the Michigan State Senate in 2006 and served until 2014. In 2015 I was appointed to the Wayne County Ethics Board and in 2016 I was appointed to a vacancy on the Wayne County Commission. I was elected to a two-year term in November 2016, 2018, 2020 and seeking my fourth term on the commission.

Why are you running again for county commission and why should voters re-elect you? I am running for re-election to the commission to continue being the voice of reason, responsible use of tax dollars and transparency. I’ve been an independent representative standing up for the citizens I represent as well as our county. I am passionate about public service and have proven I’m very responsive and responsible to our citizens. I am also the most qualified, with the depth of experience that is needed to make good decisions on behalf of our citizens.

What are your accomplishments during your term as county commissioner? During my service on the commission I have stood firm against continuing to do business with contractors who have not lived up to their previous contracts with the county and will continue to ask the tough questions that all who are in elected positions should be doing on behalf of those who have entrusted us as their representatives. I have fought for transparency and was successful in pushing for public access to our committee and full commission meetings through televising meetings. Integrity has always been foremost during my life as well as my 30 years of public service.

What are the top three priority issues that Wayne County faces and what actions would you, as commissioner, take regarding each of them?

  1. We have a massive challenge in filling vacancies in county offices and departments. These vacancies have affected services to our citizens from road maintenance, law enforcement, prosecutorial staff, to clerical positions to name a few. We are not currently paying competitive salaries, which is critical to addressing this problem.
  2. Cost-effectiveness and greater efficiency in the delivery of services to our residents is something we must continue to strive for. A broader use of technology across the county and employing greater review of processes and procedures or best practices could help us address this priority.
  3. Building our regional economy by being more aggressive with our efforts to attract new businesses, industries and increase tourism. We can do more to partner with the surrounding counties on joint efforts and greater advertising about the improved opportunities for potential developers and job creators. This will help address loss of population as we make Wayne County a better place to live, work and play.

William J. Collop, Republican

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


County Commissioner – 13th

Sam Baydoun (Formerly: Hassane Nemr Baydoun), Democrat

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


Mohammad Mubarak, Democrat

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


Abdullatif S. Aljahmi, Republican

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


Ann F. Clark, Republican

Wayne County Commission candidate Ann ClarkAge: 72

Current job: Retired

Education: Associate’s Degree in Business

Tell us about yourself in 200 words or less: My name is Ann Clark and I am a Republican, America First Candidate. My background includes working for the YMCA of Metro Detroit for 18 years followed by creating my own business focused on effective management and fund development. I am a solution-oriented businesswoman and who has successfully helped to foster thriving, healthy, diverse and resilient organizations, and companies throughout Michigan. Over the years, I have spearheaded signature fundraising events and capital campaigns for numerous organizations including Robert De Mars Charity, Habitat for Humanity, American Red Cross, Rugiero Promise Foundation and various diverse organizations throughout Metropolitan Detroit. After retirement, I became an active supporter of local charities and volunteered in the Republican Party. Created an online weekly calendar of political news and events giving residents transparency of local and state candidates and policy activities happening for the Republican Party. The calendar informs individuals of meetings and activities in which they can participate. Giving support for grassroots organizations that are fighting for legal elections, quality education in our schools, and against unconstitutional orders of the governor.

Why are you running for county commission? In the last few years, I became concerned with state policies and the effects on businesses and people of Wayne County. I decided to take action, actively working for pro-America and pro-Constitution policies. I attend meetings and volunteer in the Republican Party, grassroots organizations and community organizations that work to serve and support our community. Becoming more involved in community service, I realized the only way to truly make changes was to run for office. Citizens make a bigger impact from within the system. Therefore, I decided to run for Wayne County Commissioner.

What are the top three priority issues that Wayne County faces and what actions would you, as commissioner, take regarding each of them?

  1. Infrastructure and roads: Roads and bridges have been a disaster for years, while the Wayne County budget swelled to over $1 billion. As a commissioner, I would review the current budget. Establishing where the funds are being spent, effectiveness of programs, highlighting areas for reduction or elimination. The commission adopts and enforces rules establishing the authority of county departments and offices. They play a key role in the checks and balances of the federal and state governments. We need a real assessment and transparency of our budget. Infrastructure and roads are the priority and essential purpose of county government.
  2. Business’ rights: The commission adopts and enforces rules establishing the authority of county departments and offices. During the pandemic, liquor stores, weed dispensaries and big-box stores remained open. Small businesses were considered nonessential; they lost revenue, jobs and some never reopened. The success of already over-regulated businesses should not be at the mercy of government agencies. Commissioners had the ability and should have instructed county departments and offices to not enforce the arbitrary and overreaching mandates of the governor.
  3. Education: Parents should have a say in their child’s education. I support parents’ rights to be able to voice their concerns. Knowing the content of the school curriculum for their child and what is in the school library is essential for parents to have confidence in those systems. I support school of choice. Parents are in charge of what is best for their child, not the government.

County Commissioner – 14th

Raymond E. Basham, Democrat

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


Ashleigh Bielecki-Gamalski, Republican

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


County Commissioner – 15th

Joseph Palamara, Democrat

Candidate did not respond to survey request.


Craig Bielecki, Republican

Candidate did not respond to survey request.

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  • Dorothy Hernandez is Digital Editor for 101.9 WDET, creating digital editorial content. Her love of radio began when she had a radio show in college when she and her roommate played '80s music in the middle of the night.