This year's increased storms and subsequent floods that devastated Southeast Michigan is a new experience for many residents, Nick Schroeck of the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law says.

Each year, the number of stories highlighting the changing climate has increased. In much of the world, there’s reason for that. This year, climate change took a particular toll in Southeast Michigan, where residents experienced one of the worst flooding seasons in its history. 

“It’s a different reality, it’s a new world in a changing climate. And really what I think this year… showed us were actual impacts. We’re feeling these impacts of climate change.” — Nick Schroeck, University of Detroit Mercy School of Law

Downed power lines, flooded highways and disconnected power briefly became a regular reality for residents of Southeast Michigan.


Listen: What citizens, government officials and private businesses should be doing to defend against climate change in Michigan.


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Nick Schroeck is an associate dean of experiential education and associate professor at University of Detroit Mercy School of Law. Schroeck says the increased storms and subsequent floods that have devastated Southeast Michigan is a new experience for many residents. “It’s a different reality, it’s a new world in a changing climate,” says Schroeck. “And really what I think this year … showed us were actual impacts. We’re feeling these impacts of climate change.”

Schroeck says there are many things government officials can do to bolster our infrastructure, including expanding green space, removing concrete that lies above natural wetlands, updating an outdated power grid, trimming trees away from power lines and updating electric meters.  

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