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2020 In-Person Voting Rules Remain for Michigan’s August Primaries

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Image credit: Jake Neher/WDET

Voting booths will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Election Day, while absentee voting options still remain across the state.

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Local primary elections will be held across the State of Michigan on Tuesday. Local voting booths will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. for those who need to register to vote, or absentee voters who wish to return their ballot in person.

In the wake of the 2020 presidential election, some Republican lawmakers have pushed for more restrictive voting laws aimed at stopping non-existent fraud. However, no such rule changes have been implemented in the State of Michigan.

We’ve got lots of secure protocols in place.” —Jocelyn Benson, Michigan Secretary of State

State of Michigan
State of Michigan

Jocelyn Benson is Michigan’s Secretary of State. She says wearing a face mask at the polls is not required but is encouraged, particularly for those who are not vaccinated.

This is the fourth election in this pandemic era that we’re in,” says Benson. “So your clerks have become pretty well adjusted to ensuring the safe and healthy environments of our polling places.”

While having ID with you is encouraged, Benson says even if you do not have one you can still vote.

You can identify yourself,” says Benson, “through your signature on an affidavit and vote that way as well. We’ve got lots of secure protocols in place to ensure the integrity of the process.”

Benson says those who have requested absentee ballots can drop those off at their local clerk’s office through 8 p.m. on election night. If a voter has been sent an absentee ballot that has not yet arrived (voters can check the status of their ballots here), they can vote at their polling location on Aug. 3. They will be required to sign an affidavit that will spoil the original ballot.

Those who have not returned their absentee ballot and would prefer to vote in person can bring the ballot to their polling location on Election Day and give it to poll workers to receive a new ballot, allowing them to vote in person. Voters may also allow an immediate family member or a member of their household to drop off their sealed and signed ballot for them.


Listen: Jocelyn Benson discusses what people need to know when voting in person.


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Alex McLenon, Reporter

Alex McLenon is a Reporter with 101.9 WDET. McLenon is a graduate of Wayne State University, where he studied Media Arts & Production and Broadcast Journalism.

Follow @alexmclenon

Voter Information Center

This post is a part of Voter Information Center.

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