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Heard on Detroit Today with Stephen Henderson

Detroiter’ Mitt Romney Breaks with Party on Impeachment Vote

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Image credit: U.S. Senate

What’s next for Washington as President Trump hits the campaign trail, touting acquittal vote?

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President Donald Trump has been acquitted of two impeachment charges. 

The hearings have been endowed with an air of inevitability. But the predictable partisan conclusion of this process was upset by Sen. Mitt Romney’s (R-Utah) surprising break from party lines.

Romney, who was born in Detroit, made history with his vote to remove the president from office on the charge of abuse of power, making him the first senator to vote in favor of impeaching a president from his own party.

There are areas of agreement between Democrats and Republicans. It’s hard to imagine that happening during a presidential election year.” - Marc Kruman, Center for the Study of Citizenship

Ultimately the Utah senator’s vote didn’t impact President Trump’s swift acquittal, but it did raise questions regarding the state of American politics and the role of congress moving forward.

Click on the player above to hear a full breakdown of the Senates’ vote to acquit President Tump.  


Marc Krugman Jake Neher/WDET
Jake Neher/WDET

Marc Krugman

Guest

Marc Kruman is the founding director of the Center for the Study of Citizenship and professor of history at Wayne State University.

He says this impeachment process has, not surprisingly, been viewed through the lens of partisan politics. The unwillingness of elected officials to see beyond party has left American democracy in a fragile state, says Kruman. In order to restore some type of order he says there has to be a move toward compromise and consensus.

There are, in fact, areas of agreement between Democrats and Republicans that they should work on. It’s hard to imagine that happening during a presidential election year,” says Kruman. 


Detroit Today

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