MichMash: Former Lt. Gov. Calley On Why Mackinac Matters

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Image credit: Jake Neher/WDET

Who cares about the Mackinac Policy Conference? Here’s some reasons to pay attention.

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WDET Digital
WDET Digital

Mackinac Island — fudge, bicycles, horses, and thousands of schmoozing bigwigs. 

That last part is applicable at least one week of the year after Memorial Day weekend. The Mackinac Policy Conference is an annual gathering of some of the most influential politicians, business leaders, and non-profit folks at the Grand Hotel sponsored by the Detroit Regional Chamber.

We know what you’re thinking: The Swamp on an island (pardon the terminology). Who really cares about the Mackinac Policy Conference if you’re not a policy wonk or a business type?

It turns out, there are plenty of reasons to pay attention to what goes on each year.

As part of the weekly series MichMash, hosts Cheyna Roth and Jake Neher speak with someone who has not only attended several of these conferences, but has been directly involved in some of the major wheeling and dealing that goes on each year.

Former Lt. Gov. Brian Calley, a Republican who is now president of the Small Business Association of Michigan (SBAM), talks with Jake and Cheyna about all that happens at the Grand Hotel and why it’s important to Michigan politics and the economy.

Click on the audio player above to hear that conversation.

Jake Neher/WDET
Jake Neher/WDET

 


Jake Neher, Producer, Detroit Today

Jake Neher is a producer and reporter for Detroit Today. He has formerly reported on the Michigan legislature.

Jake.Neher@wdet.org Follow @GJNeher

Cheyna Roth, Reporter

Cheyna has interned with Michigan Radio and freelanced for WKAR public radio in Lansing. She’s also done some online freelancing and worked on documentary films.

CRoth@MPRN.org Follow @Cheyna_R

MichMash

This post is a part of MichMash.

Each week, WDET's Jake Neher and Michigan Public Radio's Cheyna Roth un-jumble Michigan issues and talk about how statewide news stories affect you. 

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