Give the gift
that gives back all year

Make your tax-deductible gift before December 31st!

Detroit Today: WDET, Data Driven Detroit Launch Detroit By The Numbers

Detroit By The Numbers is a new series on WDET that will separate fact from fiction on various myths around the region.

Sandra Svoboda says, “it was based on the idea of getting accurate facts about the city, about the region that we can all agree on.”

The first topic, one of the largest, is poverty.

Laura Weber-Davis

Stephen Henderson was joined by Sandra and Erica Raleigh from Data Driven Detroit to start the discussion about poverty and the data that surround it. Detroit has one of the highest poverty rates in the state with nearly 41 percent of Detroiters falling under the Federal Poverty Threshold.

This number can be misleading because the threshold is set low, and many agree that it is an outdated calculation. It was first calculated in the 1960s based on families spending one-third of their income on food. Today we spend far less and more on other necessities. According to Erica, families spend about 50 percent of their household income on housing and transportation costs. 

While the threshold gives a great starting point, one area of poverty that isn’t calculated by the Federal Government is the lack of access to opportunity. Data Driven Detroit, created The One D Scorecard, an interactive map that allows users to see what areas of the region have great access to opportunity and what areas have very little. While we can look at the numbers and data surround poverty, “It’s really important to keep in mind that human element” says Erica.

Detroit By The Numbers hopes to bring this human element to the numbers with its continued coverage.

Listen to Sandra’s first report on Detroit Today in the audio link above, and look for stories elsewhere at the Detroit by the Numbers page.

Powered by The Detroit Journalism Cooperative with support from The James L. Knight Foundation, The Ford Foundation, and Renaissance Journalism’s Michigan Reporting Initiative.

Image credit: Laura Weber-Davis

Filed Under: #DBTN-poverty #djc

This post is a part of Detroit by the Numbers.

WDET is putting Detroit’s urban — and suburban — data myths to the test, separating fact from fiction.  

Detroit by the Numbers is produced by WDET 101.9 FM and is powered by the Detroit Journalism Cooperative. Support for this project comes from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, Renaissance Journalism’s Michigan Reporting Initiative and the Ford Foundation.

  

 

 

About the Author

Wait a second, there’s more…

How Does Detroit Spend $37 Million in Federal Housing Dollars? [INTERVIEW]

How Poor are Detroit, Metro Area? Here’s What the Data Show [INTERVIEW]

'How's Detroit Doing?' -- Reporters Discuss Tackling Simple Yet Thorny Question

TechTown's Ned Staebler Talks Economic Development and Policing in Detroit

When $40,000 a Year is Not Enough

Detroit Family Making It Work And Working To Make Detroit Better

Detroit Mom Struggles to Make Ends Meet

DeVos Donations Raise Disturbing Questions About Political Influence In Detroit Schools

Poverty Tells 'Heartbreaking' Stories About Families

How Dearborn Schools Opened Its Doors To Immigrant Students

Where is Poverty in Metro Detroit? [Map]

Created Equal Podcast 02. Jacking the Media

Detroit: We won't move forward unless we learn to listen

The Intersection: Housing Conditions and Segregation [MAPS]

What is Poverty, and Where Does Metro Detroit Stack Up? [Infographic]

How A Detroit Blind Pig Became The Center Of A Social Uprising in 1967

The Intersection: The Psychological and Generational Effects of Poverty

Reporters Joel Kurth, Laura Herberg: Detroit Suffers from Lack of Home Mortgages

The Intersection: Focus: HOPE CEO Talks Tackling Poverty in Detroit

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan Addresses Pistons Move, Racial Tensions [VIDEO]

The Intersection: Documentary Producer Talks Growing Up In Detroit

What Trump's Military Surplus Reversal Means for Michigan Police Departments

The Intersection: What Is Detroit's Business Community Doing to Address Poverty?

We want to hear from you.
Share your thoughts and opinions: