Monkeypox and why it is a public health emergency

Most individuals who have been infected by monkeypox are men who have sex with men, but the virus can be transmitted in a variety of non-sexual ways, according to Michigan’s chief medical executive.

Vials of the monkeypox vaccine

Monkeypox vaccines are shown at the Salt Lake County Health Department Thursday, July 28, 2022, in Salt Lake City. The country’s monkeypox outbreak can still be stopped, U.S. health officials said Thursday, despite rising case numbers and so-far limited vaccine supplies.

Americans have been through a lot to protect against health scares recently. We’re still in the coronavirus pandemic, even though it is much milder for the vaccinated.

Now there’s another virus to be concerned with in the form of monkeypox. It has been declared a public health emergency due to the skyrocketing case rates and severe symptoms.

“When we talk about transmission, we’re really talking about close transmission, we’re talking about skin-to-skin contact, close, face to face contact, or contact with infected bedding and linens and things like that.” — Dr. Natasha Bagdasarian, Michigan’s chief medical executive


Listen: The threat of monkeypox to our health.

 


Guest

Dr. Natasha Bagdasarian is Michigan’s chief medical executive. She says transmission occurs through close physical contact with other people or things.

“When we talk about transmission, we’re really talking about close transmission, we’re talking about skin-to-skin contact, close, face to face contact, or contact with infected bedding and linens and things like that,” Bagdasarian says.

 

Photo credit: Rick Bowmer/AP

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