Michigan's presidential primary election is March 10th. But it's not just partisan politics on the ballot, here's the proposals WDET's reporters are watching.

On Tuesday, March 10th, Michiganders will head to the polls to vote on the Republican and Democratic Presidential nominees. When they get there, they’ll see a number of proposals on the ballot as well. 

See key information on voting below, including proposals that 101.9 WDET’s newsroom is currently reporting. This article will be updated as we publish reporting. 

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Vote on March 10th from 7:00 am – 8:00 pm

Check if you’re registered to vote and see your ballot.

Find out how to register to vote here and identify your local clerk.


On Election Day request a Democratic, Republican, or Non-Presidential Ballot

Voters will need to choose from three ballot types. They can pick a Democratic, Republican, or non-presidential ballot.

Candidates that qualified to be listed on Michigan’s ballot.

A non-presidential ballot is for voters who choose to give up voting for presidential candidates in the primary in order to keep their party affiliations private. Ballot choices are subject to the Freedom of Information Act for 22 months after an election. They will still be able to vote on local proposals.

MLive: How to recast an absentee ballot if your preferred candidate has left the race.


What’s on the ballot?

Here are the ballot initiatives and proposals 101.9 WDET’s reporters will be following in advance of the election. This list is not comprehensive, but a reflection of our newsroom reporting.

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Detroit Institute of Arts ballot initiative 

What: Wayne, Macomb and Oakland counties will be asked if they want to renew a millage for the Detroit Institute of Arts. The ten year, .2 mill tax was initially passed in 2012. It typically costs a tax payer with a $100,000 home $10 per year.

Listen to WDET Laura Herberg’s reporting on the millage.

Supporters: Salvador Salort-Pons, Director of the DIA, says the millage has allowed the museum to bus in seniors and students and fund community arts programming in the counties.

DIA Director Talks Millage Renewal on Detroit Today: “This Is Not a New Tax.”

“In the past we were an organization that generally speaking was looking a little bit inwards. Thanks to this millage and the service agreement we have with Oakland, Wayne and Macomb counties we are out-facing.”

Opponents: During the 2012 campaign the DIA said it would not ask for a renewal. Critics say it’s unfair the museum put the millage on the ballot during a primary election, which historically has low voter turnout.  

Metro Detroiters Sound Off on DIA Millage Ahead of Michigan Primary

A lawmaker has introduced a bill that would allow communities to opt out of the Detroit Institute of Arts millage renewal, should it pass. State House Rep. Jeff Yaroch represents northern Macomb County communities like Armada, Richmond and Memphis. He says he introduced the bill because most of his communities voted against the millage in 2012.

“We have our own issues to take care of. We have water, sewerage and roads issues. So maybe some of those communities would rather see their resources go to fixing their own issues than addressing another county’s issues.”


Ferndale Schools bond proposal 

What: Ferndale Public Schools has a proposal to raise $120 million over 10 years through a bond on the ballot. The bond is structured to avoid a tax increase for Ferndale residents. 

Supporters: Superintendent Dania Bazzi says the bond is needed to make improvements to the Ferndale High School and Middle School campus. 

“That campus the building was built in the 1950s. It is a solid building. But much like your home, it’s in need of mechanical, plumbing and roofing upgrades, which are substantial on a 420,000 square foot building.”

Listen to WDET Russ McNamara’s reporting on Ferndale Schools bond proposal.


Ecorse Marijuana ballot question 

What: The proposal would create a policy for the implementation of marijuana facilities, including process, fees and criteria for licensing. The proposal would prohibit sales or marijuana within 1,000 feet of schools, include equity plans for communities impacted by the prohibition of marijuana, and implement a business excise tax. 


Plymouth-Canton School Bond 

What: Proposal to allow Plymouth-Canton Community Schools to borrow up to $275,000,000 through the issuance of general obligation bonds for the purpose of upgrading school facilities, construction of a new stadium, acquiring instructional technology, and preparing new activity and athletic facilities. Repayment of the bonds is expected to incur an average of 1.65 mills annually for up to 20 years, typically costing a homeowner with a $100,000 home $82.50 a year. See more information here.


Macomb Intermediate Regional School District Millage 

What: Proposal to increase a millage on taxable property by 1.9 mills over 10 years, 2020 to 2029, for enhancements to local public school districts. The millage would raise an estimated $55 million if approved, and typically cost a homeowner with a $100,000 home $95 a year.

Schools that would benefit from the millage include Anchor Bay School District, Armada Area Schools, Center Line Public Schools, Chippewa Valley Schools, Clintondale Community Schools, Eastpointe Public Schools, Fitzgerald Public Schools, Fraser Public Schools, Lake Shore Public Schools, Lakeview Public Schools, L’Anse Creuse Public Schools, Mount Clemens Community Schools, New Haven Community Schools, Richmond Community Schools, Romeo Community Schools, Roseville Community Schools, South Lake Schools, South Lake Schools, Utica Community Schools, Van Dyke Public Schools, Warren Consolidated Schools, Warren Woods Public Schools and Macomb Intermediate School District.


Birmingham School Bond Proposal 

What: A proposal to allow Birmingham Public Schools to borrow up to $195,000,000 through the issuance of general obligation bonds for the purpose of upgrading school facilities, construction of a new stadium, acquiring instructional technology, and preparing new activity and athletic facilities. Repayment of the bonds is expected to incur an average of 1.24 mills annually for up to 20 years, typically costing a homeowner with a $100,000 home $62 a year.


Southfield School Replacement Millage 

What: Proposal to extend a millage on taxable property for up to 18 mills for general school operating purposes, restricted to 16.9698 mills on owner-occupied homes, for 10 years, 2020 to 2029. This millage would raise approximately $42,309,000 in the first year.


Center Line Public Safety Renewal Millage 

What: Proposal to allow the city to continue to levy a 7.5 mils property tax in Center Line for 10 years, 2021 through 2030, for public safety, police and fire. Based on current taxable property value the millage would raise approximately $1,160,000, and typically cost a homeowner with a $100,000 home $375 a year.


Clinton Township Marijuana Proposal 

What: Proposal to authorize amend the township ordinances to allow marijuana establishments. 


Farmington Public Schools Bond Proposal 

What: Proposal to allow Farmington Public School District to borrow up to $98 million for remodeling school district buildings for safety and security improvements, constructions additions to school district buildings, improve athletic facilities and sites, acquire school buses and acquire technology. The millage required to repay the debt is is not expected to exceed 3.2 mills and is estimated to average 1.12 mills. The bonds may be issues over multiple years and must be repaid within 20 years of issuance. Read more here.

Author

  • Shiraz Ahmed served as Digital and Audience Engagement Editor for 101.9 WDET from 2019-2020. His favorite salsa is Marco’s Mexican salsa, a now-defunct chain that produced the salsa of his childhood.